Let’s Talk about Coronavirus – with our Kids

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Thanks for joining us for this episode of Centra Scripts, where we talk health and wellness and practical tips for your everyday life. And now here’s your host, Kate Kolb.

Kate Kolb:

Thanks for tuning in for this next episode of Centra Scripts and we know that things have been a little bit hectic and a little bit crazy right now and we kind of wanted to take a little bit of a departure from some of our normal episode content that we have been working on and talk a little bit about something that’s happening right now with everything going on, this big elephant in the room, this thing called Coronavirus. So we’re going to talk today about something that is kind of near and dear to my heart. I’m a parent of three children and this has been an interesting topic to have floating around my house and a lot of my friends who have children have had this topic come up. And a big conversation piece of this is, how do we talk to our kids about this?

Kate Kolb:

So we just want to take a few minutes today and just learn a little bit about what it is to have a conversation about Coronavirus with your kids and how do you talk to them about this. I’m really excited today to welcome to the program Mr. Duane Kresge. He is from Johnson Health Center here in town, one of our community health providers. And I’m a little extra excited because he’s also my dad. So thanks dad for being willing to do this episode with me today.

Duane Kresge:

Sure.

Kate Kolb:

And this is fun. We’ve never done anything like this before. So let’s talk a little bit about your background. You are a certified pediatric nurse practitioner and you’ve been in nursing now for over 40 years and specifically PNP certified for over 30 of that. So tell me a little bit about kind of your background in terms of what made you want to go into pediatrics and that sort of thing.

Duane Kresge:

Well, if anybody had asked me when I was in nursing school, I would’ve said peds was my least favorite area. But as it turned out, I worked on an Indian reservation for three years and it was during that time I worked pretty closely with mother and baby unit and the peds unit. And I started to realize I had a little bent towards that area. And the pediatricians I was working with, they were saying, “This definitely may be your area.” And then I transferred to the Air Force and my first job there, I ended up with a job that was working with peds as well. And once again, I was finding myself specialing some of the kids and doing the transport and everything. And then it became the reality.

Kate Kolb:

And then the rest is history. Yeah. Well, that’s awesome. And you’ve been with Johnson Health Center (JHC) now for how many years?

Duane Kresge:

About seven and a half now.

Kate Kolb:

Okay. Time flies, huh?

Duane Kresge:

Yeah.

Kate Kolb:

That’s awesome. Well, let’s talk a little bit about JHC, because at Centra, they’ve been one of our collaborative partners in some of this women’s and children’s initiatives that we’ve had in our community. And also you guys are making great strides in what you’re doing with indigent care and things like that. So for those who might not be as familiar with you guys, what primarily does Johnson Health Center focus on and how are you guys reaching the community?

Duane Kresge:

Well sure, yeah, the Johnson Health Center is a federally qualified health center, which is an organization that provides comprehensive primary care and preventative care, including health, oral, mental health, substance abuse, to persons in all ages. And that is regardless of their ability to pay or health insurance status. So we really try to meet the needs of all of those out there that need that extra help.

Kate Kolb:

Well, we certainly appreciate it, like I said, all that you’re doing to help meet the needs of the community and all of the support that you guys have had for Centra in the years of partnership there. So yeah, thank you for being here today and I’m excited to kind of talk about this with you. I think this idea of, gosh, we are just inundated with all of this information about the Coronavirus. And I know as adults, it feels very overwhelming, much less how are we going to talk about that with our kids? And I’m a parent, I have three kids and we have had multiple conversations in my household about this and it’s been just a little frightening in spots and it’s been overwhelming in other spots. And there’s been many times when I’ve just had to say, “I don’t know. I don’t know the answer to that question.” So I think a lot of this information coming in, it’s been very hard to interpret. It’s extremely clinical in nature. Maybe for you, maybe you’re understanding it.

Duane Kresge:

I find my moments of being overwhelmed as well.

Kate Kolb:

Oh good. Okay. It’s not just us. And again, it can be kind of frankly frightening, even for adults in the room. You’ve got the whole situation. Now the schools are closing and everybody’s lives are kind of upended. And of course, this beast of the thing called social media that just runs rampant with all kinds of things coming in day after day. And the conversation on this is changing at an almost hourly basis, it feels like.

Duane Kresge:

Absolutely.

Kate Kolb:

Let’s talk about some ways today that we can have this conversation with our kids in a way that not only they’ll understand, but in a way that is comforting to them and kind of what that looks like for different age groups. I guess the first thing that I want to ask you is why is it necessary and why is it even a good thing to have a conversation with your kids about this?

Duane Kresge:

Well, certainly all of our kids are at different stages of life and they certainly are hearing information coming at them from all directions. And because of that, we just need to try to be aware of what they’ve heard and how they may be taking that information to heart and how personally, how it’s affecting them.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah, which is huge. And think we were talking earlier, there’s so many different ways that you can approach this conversation and there’s a lot of different tips coming out of a lot of different areas of specialties and things like that. You and I were conversing earlier specifically about some of these articles that you had found that you guys were using within your walls at GHC and you have heard other people have used, things that are coming out from places like the New York Times and Harvard health and even the CDC. We’ve kind of gone through those and we’ve looked at some tips. Then also some things that you’ve just been telling your parents as they’ve come into the practice. So let’s kind of outlay that. I kind of want to take a look at some of those and just kind of have a discussion about the better way that we can talk to our kids as parents. I think the number one thing that we kept seeing was kind of taking an assessment of what your kids already know, what they may have already heard from all their varying sources of information. Why is that important before you have this conversation?

Duane Kresge:

Well, certainly kids kind of take in information in different ways and it can cause different levels of anxiety or fear, which will definitely affect their behavior in different ways. So we really want to know what have you heard? What have you heard your friends say? What have you heard that sometimes makes you feel a little uneasy or scares you? Go ahead and ask those questions because they may not be able to verbalize those fears about when we start asking them those questions, it helps them have an avenue to share that kind of information with us.

Kate Kolb:

You mentioned the anxiety, asking them about their anxiety. How important is it also on the parent side of things, the parental side of things, to make sure that our anxiety is under control? Talk to me a little bit about that. What that looks like at the beginning of the conversation?

Duane Kresge:

Oh yeah, we definitely need to check our anxiety first, which we’re all there. I mean, never before have we had to experience such a beast. And it’s changed all of our lives in a matter of just weeks. So yeah, we have to check our anxiety first so that we can kind of approach it in a calm manner that doesn’t kind of give that same anxiety to our kids. So just really taking a step back, taking a deep breath, calming our spirits, and then just saying, “Okay, talk to me about what you’re feeling.”

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. How important is it also to though own … Can we say, “Yeah, this kind of frightens me a little bit.” Or can we say, “I’m nervous about this too.” Is that something that will cause a child more anxiety if we’re a little bit transparent, or how do you think that that usually works?

Duane Kresge:

Oh no, I think that’s a great way to approach it. I think if kids know that we’re struggling with some of those very same things and feelings and anxieties, then that makes them feel like, okay, I’m normal and it’s all right to talk about this. Because oftentimes kids will just think, I’m the only one that feels this way. And that certainly isn’t the case. And we want them to be comfortable enough to say, “I’m a little scared too. I’m not sure what’s going on.”

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. And to that point, I think we’ve talked a little bit about this, you and I, about acknowledging the fear that your child does have and being careful not to dismiss it. I think that there’s certainly an element sometimes in our parental side of things that we’re just kind of like, you’ll be fine. You’ll be fine. Don’t worry about it. And so how do we address that as we talk to them?

Duane Kresge:

We definitely want to take those cues from them so that we can emphasize to them that it’s okay. You can own those feelings. They’re your feelings and we want you to have those feelings. It’s okay to cry. It’s okay to have an anxious moment and just talk through that with them, because those are the things we’re going to start looking for. What are they doing? Are they suddenly a lot quieter than they usually are? Are they acting out more, sassing back more? Or are they being more withdrawn? Do they seem more depressed? Those are the cues we want to start looking for.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. Okay. Well, and let’s talk a little bit then about … Okay. Obviously not all our children are the same age. There’s a widespread of ages and things like that. My three children are 12, 10 and 8 and different varying grade levels, of course. So what does it look like to have these conversations? Talk us through maybe what that looks like for a couple of different age brackets.

Duane Kresge:

Well, certainly in your younger kids, for them it’s just the reassurance, lots of extra hugs and loves, just telling them that, “I know that everything seems really different right now, life isn’t quite what we normally have, but it’s okay, we’re here, we’re going to walk through this with you. We love you very much. We’re going through this together.” For the younger kids, they need that. Well, for the older kids too. They need to know too that you’re walking through the same thing with them, just giving them that secure love right now that they really need.

Kate Kolb:

What does it look like maybe if you do have older children, older adolescents, high school, even into early young adult years, can you be a little more frank in your conversations with them? Is that something that’s age-appropriate? What does that look like in terms of disseminating the information?

Duane Kresge:

Oh yeah. I think definitely we need to be able to talk about the detail sometimes. I think for the older kids, they want to know more of the why’s and the wherefores of what’s going on. And they have a better way of relating to that if they know more details about things and why they have to do things. If we certainly say, “Just do it because I told you so.” That really never works.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. That never goes over well for anybody.

Duane Kresge:

They need to know, why do we need to do this? What’s the reason behind it? And understanding that, giving them that information gives them a more concrete feeling of what’s taking place and how to deal with it.

Kate Kolb:

Well, talking about that concept of the why behind something like that, let’s talk a little bit about the fact that schools are now closed in our area, at least. I know that around the country not everyone has fully closed yet in different places, but for our immediate area, life looks nothing like it did two weeks ago. And these kids left school on a day where they thought they were going to be coming back on Monday and it just didn’t happen. So how do we frame talking about school closures and activity closures? I mean, some of these kids are used to playing sports multiple times a week. What does that look like in terms of how to appropriately have that conversation with the why that you were talking about?

Duane Kresge:

Yeah, I guess again that means we’ve just got to talk about the reasons for that. Usually, if we just say, “It’s closed, that’s what they want us to do.” It doesn’t leave a good taste in their mouth. So saying, “This is what the president’s asking us to do. We need the social distancing that is going to allow to hopefully cut down on the transmission of this virus.” So just having that discussion with them, talking about the hygiene, why we do it. I mean, we have to tell our kids, “Wash your hands. Wash your hands.” If that’s all we’re saying and we’re not giving them why they need to wash their hands, they don’t hear us.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah, exactly. And that was another point that I wanted to bring up, this conversation about hygiene in general. I think as a parent I say 30 million times a day, it feels like sometimes, “Go wash your hands. Just go wash your hands.” Like you just said, they’re not going to understand the length of time, why they’re doing it, am I just spraying my kid down with Lysol every time they move around. Explain to us maybe some good ways that we can have a little bit more of an expansive conversation about good hygiene right now.

Duane Kresge:

Well, just understanding that germs are everywhere and I think they know that, but that everything we touch, somebody else has touched or multiple people have touched. Now with this Coronavirus, that’s something we can’t just take for granted. We need to be washing those germs off. That means that 20 seconds of washing your hands while singing Happy Birthday Times Two in order to really get your hands washed while wiping things off. And kids need to understand why they’re doing that. If we just tell them to wash their hands, it just, it doesn’t go.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. So definitely emphasizing the why behind what they’re doing is going to really help improve their psychological connection with what’s going on too.

Duane Kresge:

Absolutely.

Kate Kolb:

You talked a little bit about social distancing in your response a few minutes ago and I want to ask specifically about this phrase that we have heard over and over again in the news and from varying sources, this idea of flattening the curve. Is that a concept that we can even talk to our kids about in a way that they would understand, do you think?

Duane Kresge:

Oh yeah, I think so. I think just getting them to understand that it’s the transmission process is all in the close proximity that we can have with each other, in the classrooms, in the desk, they’re all arranged we’re close, we’re eating lunch together. All those things are close proximity and this virus loves that. That’s how we can transfer it from one person to another. They only have to sneeze on another person or cough on another person and they’ve shared those viruses. So that’s why it’s so important.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. I was talking about all the different resources that have come through for all this information. What does exposure to news, like actual news stories and social media and stuff like that, how important or not important is that in varying different levels of development for kids?

Duane Kresge:

Well, certainly the younger kids, they could take it or leave it. They’re just walking by the screen and their parents look like they’re mesmerized. But then as they start to watch, maybe you look more anxious or stuff, kids start to pick up on that. Kids can pick up on our attention in the house. So it’s really important to just be aware of what you’re watching, how much exposure is there. Some of the older kids are hearing it, they’re bombarded with it, it’s on their phones, it’s on the television, it’s in the news, it’s everywhere. So it just becomes a barrage of information that can be very anxiety-provoking.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. So just maybe be aware of how much of that you’re turning on at all times. Find something else a little less intense to watch.

Duane Kresge:

Play some music. Take a walk. Just anything to just kind of break that media. I mean, we all want to know what’s going on and be aware, but sometimes we just need to shut it off so that everybody can have a break.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. Yeah. And that’s super important. And kind of moves into this next point, the next tip that I wanted to talk about. There’s this thing called reassurance-seeking, which is basically kids in varying different age levels just really looking for this reassurance from you that everything’s going to be okay. What are some signifiers of that, that might make themselves known in different age groups?

Duane Kresge:

Yeah, well, I’d say probably for the younger kids, you may notice them following you around in every room in the house or you’re getting hugs. Everywhere you go, they’re giving you a hug. Those are usually cues that they’re not feeling real comfortable right now, maybe feeling a little insecure. For your older kids that may be, they may just react a little bit more on edge than they would normally do or they would say something that just isn’t typical of their personality. Those are all little cues that you want to start looking for. Is your child being a lot quieter than usual? Or maybe they’re in the room a lot? They don’t know how to express what they’re feeling, so they just kind of withdraw. Those are the cues you want to start looking for.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. That’s funny about the younger kids. My youngest is eight and I think in the last three days I’ve probably had 57 different hugs from him, just in a very short amount of time and he’s a hugger naturally anyway. But I’ve noticed he, every time I walk into the room, he needs a hug from me. So yeah, it’s definitely something that I’m even seeing, with my own kids just making sure like, “Oh, life feels out of control. What can you do to help me make it feel better right now?”

Kate Kolb:

You said a little bit about, especially in the older kids, this idea of claiming your feelings and kind of what that looks like. Several friends of mine and I in the past week have even had these conversations where the only way that we can really describe how we’re feeling about life right now is it just feels gray. Like it just feels like there’s this blanket of uncertainty and this grayness over life. And I guess talk to me a little bit about maybe … And I don’t know that this pertains so much to some of the younger ones because maybe they’re not developmentally there yet, but especially in kind of that maybe middle school and older. What does that mental health discussion look like with those kids?

Duane Kresge:

Well, sometimes I think that they may not just walk up to us and say, “Hey, I’m feeling like this.”

Kate Kolb:

Right.

Duane Kresge:

We need to kind of lead into that discussion saying, “You know, I know a lot of changes have taken place. You’re missing the routine of school, your classes, your classmates, your sports, your events. All that’s got to feel very different to you. And it’s okay to feel that way.” And ask them, “How do you feel about that? Do you have any concerns right now?” Just offering those opportunities to share those feelings.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. And I’ve found … I think that the disclaimer we sometimes fall under with kids is, “Oh, they’ll let me know if they feel bad.” Or, “Oh, they’re not saying much. So that must not be affecting them.” And I know with my kids, there’s been several times where I thought they were completely fine and I would start a conversation about something and pretty soon I have three balling children on my hands, because of stress that they’re under. So just being mindful of, like you said earlier, changes in behavior and making sure that we’re very much giving validity to their feelings and that it’s okay to own those in that moment. So that’s huge for sure.

Kate Kolb:

The last tip that I wanted to talk about here that you and I had kind of collected from some of these articles and talking to each other about what you’ve been doing in your practice and what you recommend is this idea of, okay, all of our lives have been completely turned upside down. Nobody’s going to anything anymore. Nobody’s seeing each other. What does it look like to still … They’re recommending to still stick to a routine. What does that look like? Do I still get up at 5:30 in the morning? Do I make sure that everybody’s still doing things on a rigid schedule? What does keeping a routine actually look like in this very unprecedented time that we’re in?

Duane Kresge:

Well, yeah, I mean, it looks different for everybody. Everybody’s family’s a little different. But trying to find that happy medium. Try to get morning routine where everybody gets up somewhat of assemblance of a time together, maybe to have a meal together. It’s really important. Some kids are more apt to just kind of conversate over a meal. So just give them that opportunity. Try not to lay around in your pajamas all day long,

Kate Kolb:

Oh man.

Duane Kresge:

Just say, “Okay, it’s 10 o’clock, why doesn’t everybody get dressed for the day and let’s go take a walk or do something.” And just kind of find some type of a routine even in our totally non-routine days.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. Well, I think it’s important to note too that, like you said just a few minutes ago, not everybody’s household is going to look the same. You’ve got a household full of people that aren’t used to being around each other all the time that are now living in this space days.

Duane Kresge:

Absolutely.

Kate Kolb:

And you’re having to give allowances for those things. And I know we were talking earlier just the differences in even our personalities. I’m your daughter, you’re my dad. I am much more spontaneous. I’m much more like, “Hey, no routine. Great.” And this is probably giving you-

Duane Kresge:

I’m used to routine. So it’s my life. So yeah.

Kate Kolb:

So finding that balance is super important for sure and being able to navigate these days. We’ve kind of had these sort of nine tips that we’ve outlaid here and I want to do something a little bit different with you now and just have the chance to have some kids ask you some questions. It’s going to work out.

Duane Kresge:

It should be fun.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. Since we’re all family here right now and my kids are here and they’ve actually been asking really good questions. So I just want to take a few minutes and have them ask you some questions about the virus if that works for you.

Duane Kresge:

Sounds like fun. I’m ready for it.

Kate Kolb:

Okay. Let’s do it. Awesome. All right. So I’ve got two of my kids here with us. We’ve got Elena. Say hi Elena.

Elena:

Hi.

Kate Kolb:

This is Aidan.

Aidan:

Hello.

Kate Kolb:

And they’re going to ask you some questions that we’ve been talking about, about Coronavirus. This is their papa. So if you hear them reference that, this is papa answering questions. All right. So Elena, I think you had the first question. What do you want to ask?

Elena:

So what exactly does coronavirus mean and what does COVID-19 mean?

Duane Kresge:

Well, Coronavirus is the name that gave this particular virus and the COVID-19 is just the exact name they’ve given it. Coronavirus has actually been around for years, but this particular virus, Corona-19, is what’s causing this pandemic right now.

Kate Kolb:

Okay, Aidan, what do you think?

Aidan:

Can I catch this virus easily?

Duane Kresge:

Well that is why, you know, when they sent you home from school and said everybody needs to spend about six feet apart. Well, the reason they did that is that because that’s the kind of distance we need so we’re not picking up the germs like when somebody coughs or sneezes. It helps protect us from that.

Elena:

I also know it’s an air spread virus. So do you have to be close to the person with the virus or can it spread long distances?

Duane Kresge:

Again, that’s why they want us to bend the distance between each other or have distance between each other, at least six feet is what they’re saying. So that if somebody sneezes or coughs, that’s about as far as that germ will fly through the air. So if you’re standing that far away from someone, you’re not as apt to pick that up.

Kate Kolb:

Who knew germs flew? Did you guys know that?

Aidan:

How fast can this virus spread?

Duane Kresge:

Well, it depends on how close we’re with people. If somebody has the virus and you’re within close proximity to them, then you’re more apt to be able to pick up that virus if they’re sneezing or they’re coughing or if they’re touching things that you’re touching. And again, that’s why everybody says, “Wash your hands.”

Kate Kolb:

Wash your hands. Do you know how long you’re supposed to wash your hands for?

Elena:

Two minutes.

Kate Kolb:

Oh, she’s going extra long. Do you know?

Aidan:

A minute three.

Kate Kolb:

My kids are extra clean, you guys, extra clean. Actually, it’s about 20 seconds-

Duane Kresge:

20 seconds.

Kate Kolb:

… is considered a good hand washing. Do what song you’re supposed to sing?

Elena:

ABCs

Kate Kolb:

ABCs. Or have you heard the other one?

Duane Kresge:

Happy Birthday Times Two.

Kate Kolb:

You sing happy birthday twice or go through your ABCs and you’ve washed your hands long enough for that. So yeah, now you know. I better be hearing a lot of singing. All right, Elena, did you have another question?

Elena:

What does pandemic mean?

Duane Kresge:

That means that it’s a virus that has started in a lot of different parts of the country and it’s becoming all over the place. All kinds of countries have it and it’s become to the point so it’s not just one part of the world, it’s all over the world. That’s what that word means.

Aidan:

Why are some people wearing masks and what do they do?

Duane Kresge:

A lot of people that you’re seeing in the healthcare field are wearing masks to protect themselves from the people that have the virus so that they’re not as apt to get it. They’re wearing these special masks that are called N95 masks. So those are good ways to from catching a virus from somebody else. And that’s why they wear all those funny clothing that you see them in. They’ve got a mask on and they’ve got these big shields on their face and the gowns that they’re wearing. Those are all protective equipment that they’re wearing so they don’t get the virus.

Kate Kolb:

What about face masks? Because you see some people out in the stores, if you’re out at the grocery store or something, there’s some just regular people in the community that are wearing face masks too. Is that important? Necessary?

Duane Kresge:

Well, it certainly is a preventative measure that some people can do. Just again, so if somebody around you that’s coughing, that’s one protective shield that you have.

Kate Kolb:

Elena, did you have another question?

Elena:

Yes. Why did schools have to close and what’s the thing called social distancing?

Duane Kresge:

The schools closed, again, because they wanted us to not be so close together. All your desk at school are really close together. You eat lunch close together. You’re in lines close together. All those things are in close proximity. So meaning you’re just right behind somebody breathing on another person, sneezing on another person. So that means you’re more apt to give or catch something from somebody or give something to somebody. So they closed the schools in order to help improve the distancing. Okay?

Kate Kolb:

So social distancing, then, if we had a quick answer to give you guys, what would that look like?

Duane Kresge:

Basically you’re just trying to keep a lot of people together out of big areas.

Kate Kolb:

And how far apart are you supposed to stand?

Elena:

Six feet.

Aidan:

Six feet.

Kate Kolb:

Boom.

Duane Kresge:

Absolutely. You guys have it down.

Kate Kolb:

You got it. Good job. Well, anything else that you want to ask papa? Any other questions?

Elena:

No.

Aidan:

No.

Kate Kolb:

No, that answered all your burning questions?

Elena:

Yes.

Aidan:

Yeah.

Kate Kolb:

Well yeah, so thank you again, dad, for doing this with me. Again, Duane Kresge from the Johnson Health Center, specifically with the Amherst Community Health Center. And I guess just to wrap this up, just some quick reminders here at the end, if we could just hit a couple of these things. It’s really super important to remember to keep the conversation going and-

Duane Kresge:

Yeah, definitely remembering that we want to be able to be the soundboard for our kids. If they’ve got a question or they’re acting a little anxious or just uncomfortable with what’s going on around them, we want to be there and be available.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. And then again, just to remember that it’s super important to keep a schedule, to keep a routine, but to also take time to enjoy the little things. What did you guys do with nana the other day?

Elena:

We …

Duane Kresge:

Went hiking.

Kate Kolb:

You did, you went hiking-

Aidan:

Yeah, we went hiking.

Kate Kolb:

… but you stayed six feet away from each other.

Aidan:

It was a little bit hard.

Kate Kolb:

It was a little bit hard.

Aidan:

Because the trail was like close together.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. You painted rocks. You guys had been working on worksheets and stuff.

Elena:

We went to the D Day Memorial.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. So you know, taking the opportunity to maybe, with your family in a very, again, healthy social distancing way, not with big groups of people, adhering to all of the rules that are coming out about 10 or less and that sort of thing. Still finding ways to embrace the little moments too and being able to enjoy those within that schedule that you’re keeping. And then just finally, we talked about this earlier too, but remembering that just a little reassurance goes a really long way and that our medical and community heroes are doing a great job of keeping us safe. Isn’t that cool, guys? That there’s so many people working so hard for all of us?

Elena:

Yeah.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah. What do you guys want to say to all these people that are working in the hospitals and in the health centers and stuff?

Aidan:

Thanks a lot.

Kate Kolb:

Thanks a lot. They’re working hard to keep us all safe, huh?

Elena:

Yeah.

Kate Kolb:

That’s pretty cool. We have a community full of heroes that we get to say thank you to every day. And all our firefighters and other community heroes. And actually just you guys as listeners too, you guys are taking the opportunity to share cards with some of these nursing homes that don’t have visitors anymore. I’ve seen tons of people dropping off food and gift cards for people in need and that sort of thing. And it’s just been really neat to see the community really step up and kind of take an opportunity in something that we didn’t see coming, but to take an opportunity to make it good out of the bad.

Duane Kresge:

Absolutely.

Kate Kolb:

So yeah, that’s been really good. Well, thanks guys for asking questions and for hanging out with us. And thank you again, dad, for your expertise and your time here with us.

Duane Kresge:

Thank you for the time.

Kate Kolb:

Yeah, absolutely. And we hope that this has been helpful and please stay tuned to CentraScripts.com. For more information as we put out blogs and additional materials on this. And as always, you can always check out our Coronavirus page on our main website as well. CentraHealth.com/Coronavirus. We’ve got all the updates constantly going there so please go there for more information. And thanks a lot for listening.

The 30 day Corona Virus Challenge

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